FAQ

Q?What areas do you serve?
A.

We work in Berlin, Chester, Cromwell, Durham, East Berlin, East Haddam, East Hampton, Haddam, Haddam Neck, Higganum, Kensington, Killingworth, Meriden, Middle Haddam, Middlefield, Middletown, Moodus, North Branford, North Madison, Portland, Rockfall, Rocky Hill, South Glastonbury, Southington, Wallingford and Wethersfield.

Q?Is there are charge for an estimate?
A.

No, there is no charge for an estimate.

Q?Why can’t you give me an estimate over the phone?
A.

Every tree is unique, and the conditions in which it grows also make a difference. We send a licensed arborist to your property to give you a written estimate so that both you and we know exactly what needs to be done and what equipment will be needed.

Q?When and why should my trees be pruned?
A.

The best time to remove dead or diseased wood from a tree is right away. For other types of pruning, it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. Pruning often stimulates new growth, unless the tree is dormant. Call us for a consultation, and we will make appropriate suggestions, based on the tree species and the season.

Q?What should I do about my neighbor’s tree?
A.

The law concerning trees that are on or near property lines is extremely complex. We prefer to have the owner’s permission before removing branches from a tree, even when those branches overhang another property.

Q?Should I paint over where a branch has been removed?
A.

The tree care industry no longer recommends painting of wounds in trees. Paint does not improve the health of the tree and may, in fact, provide an environment in which fungal spores or bacteria thrive. A healthy tree that has been properly pruned will grow a callus over the wound, compartmentalizing the area. Plants heal differently than animals do.

Q?Is this tree my problem or my town’s?
A.

If you’re not sure who owns a tree near a right of way, we recommend that you call your town or city hall and ask for the Tree Warden. Every town and city in Connecticut has a Tree Warden, whose job it is to protect the trees on public property and to protect the residents and their property from those trees, should they become a hazard.

Q?Why is my dwarf tree getting so big?
A.

There are very few true dwarf trees in nature, and even science has been unable to create a tree that will grow just so big and then stop. It is normal and healthy for a tree to keep growing, but we can help you control your tree’s ultimate shape so it suits your needs.

Q?Which is scarier, the insects or the pesticides?
A.

New pesticides and pesticide delivery methods are being developed all the time. Our employees are trained in safe spraying methods, and we always recommend the product that will most directly target the pest, not the rest of your property or beneficial insects that may be in the way. We practice Integrated Pest Management techniques, and frequently use injectable pesticides that leave no harmful residues on your property.

Q?Hasn’t the Hemlock woolly adelgid been eliminated?
A.

While researchers in Connecticut have been successful in locating a natural predator of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, that predator is still in such short supply that it is only being used in certain State forests by employees of the CT Agricultural Experiment Station.

Q?Should I put mulch around my trees?
A.

Mulch is a wonderful protector of trees, since lawnmowers and weed-whackers are the most common cause of tree injuries. BUT – too much mulch is also your tree’s enemy. The mulch should not touch the trunk of the tree, since the moist mulch provides a perfect home for decay-causing fungi. A layer of no more than 6 inches of mulch is fine, and can extend as far out into your lawn or garden as you wish. Mulch also discourages weeds and grasses that compete with your trees for water and nutrients.